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Disclaimer: I am a huge fan of the artists I refer to in this post. If anyone from the Beyhive is reading, don’t @ me. I have seen Beyoncé 5 times and will see her again in July, I got receipts

Unapologetically Black But Won’t Tour In Africa…Hmmm

Love all these American and even British artists using African influences in hair, clothes, music and more. It is so inspiring and makes me so proud to be black, so proud to be African and it really is changing the game. But when was the last time they went?

And no, I don’t mean when was the last time they gave money or the last time they went to Uganda to take pictures. I mean when was the last time they went to perform and really showcase their talent which Africa has so heavily influenced? Celebrities and artists who go on “world” tours only seem to go to western countries even when their musical production, choreography, lyrics and costume are heavily influenced by African countries. I’m really sorry guys but I’m afraid a date in South Africa doesn’t count- amazing as that is, it is the equivalent of saying ‘I ain’t racist, my best friend’s step-sister’s cousin is black’.

South Africa is an amazing country with so much history, influence and importance but there are 53 other countries in Africa. Going to one isn’t good enough and to be honest, it’s been a while since anyone big has even toured there.

I can’t get my head around it. I can imagine artists sitting there in a board meeting discussing dates and places and I don’t get how a whole continent can get missed out. A WHOLE CONTINENT. If you like your cornrow (Kim K Boxer-Braids), African print, afros and your negro nose, there are plenty of them in Ghana, Nigeria, Egypt, Algeria, Morocco, Angola, Tunisia, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and many other countries.

If it’s music venues you are worried about, don’t worry I got you. If churches can have whole day outdoor crusades with other 30,000 people, you can grace the stage to twerk for an hour and a bit, we have the resources.

If it’s safety you are worried about, hahah; don’t worry we got you. Africans don’t play, If you are of any kind of importance, the president is meeting you at the airport and you will be escorted anywhere with a ten car convoy, don’t get it twisted, you will legit feel like royalty for the time you are there.

I recall when my very normal uncle went to Congo from London with a few leaders from a normal church. To their surprise the president had sent the armed forces to meet them at the airport and escort them wherever they wanted to go for the rest of their stay. The president even apologised for not being able to meet them himself!

If it’s because of political reasons, then don’t tour anywhere; especially the U.S. where its no longer stupid to suggest Donald Trump will be the next president.

But don’t worry guys, not everyone is doing this. I’ve done my research and there are some people not just performing in Africa but really immersing themselves in the culture and these are not even artists that fly the ‘I Love Africa Flag’. I salute you and truly respect you, It’s crazy how the images below make me so happy.  I just wish bigger artists would do the same.

A photo posted by @chrisbrownofficial on

 

 

What do you think ?

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  • RainingOposites

    Nas performs in Africa often what the fuck are you even talking about lol

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  • Will

    Just wait and see Taylor Swift be the first to show up in Africa lol.

  • fromanotherplanet

    I am so sick and tired of us Africans blaming everyone else for our issues, everyone but us. I am over it.

    Can we Africans just receive criticism without resorting to ” but but but black Americans do this and black Americans do that??” Most Westerners, black Americans included, are ignorant about Africa. I am not excusing the behavior but why are you bringing it up? Are you not capable of accepting criticism without resorting to the blame game?

    I am African, born and bred, and Africans like to act as if black Americans owe them something when the curricula in the African educational system ironically pays very little attention to the slave trade. In fact, I learned more about the trans Atlantic slave trade when I studied abroad than I did in Africa. Ain’t that something? I grew up next to a slave port and I didn’t even know it was a slave port until I studied abroad. Most Africans are completely removed from our complicity in the slave trade. We simply do not care yet we have the audacity to have excessive expectations of diaspora blacks? Bye girl. Black Americans have their own culture and heritage. Yes, they are descendants from the motherland but they are NOT Africans. They do not owe you anything, so stop asking.

    Also, let us not sit here and act like there are a plethora of places on the African continent with proper amenities to organize and host concerts of the magnitude as Beyonce’s. Let us not please. Again, I am born and bred in West Africa (Cameroon and naija). I am very well traveled in the region and I can literally count the number of venues that can support a large scale concert on one hand. Even the ones that do are poorly organized and you have to deal with shady organizers and poor security. I recently attended a show in Ivory Coast in a superb venue but the organization was a total mess.

    Most of you on the internet who are always trying to come for anyone who is critical of Africans are usually African immigrants abroad or kids of African immigrants with your Western passports, utterly clueless about the realities in the motherland. Instead of blaming others, how about to you build YOUR community of Africans? Instead of worrying about Beyonce’s concert why not worry about the fact that YOU have never attended the concert of a local African artist in an African venue?

    Let me ask the author of this article: How many African artists’ music have you LEGALLY purchased on itunes?? How many African artists have you financially supported? Worry about that good sis, and I am done. Africans exhaust the frick outta me I tell you.

    END OF RANT!!

  • fromanotherplanet

    I am so sick and tired of us Africans blaming everyone else for our issues, everyone but us. I am over it.

    Can we Africans just receive criticism without resorting to ” but but but black Americans do this and black Americans do that??” Most Westerners, black Americans included, are ignorant about Africa. I am not excusing the behavior but why are you bringing it up? Are you not capable of accepting criticism without resorting to the blame game?

    I am African, born and bred, and Africans like to act as if black Americans owe them something when the curricula in the African educational system ironically pays very little attention to the slave trade. In fact, I learned more about the trans Atlantic slave trade when I studied abroad than I did in Africa. Ain’t that something? I grew up next to a slave port and I didn’t even know it was a slave port until I studied abroad. Most Africans are completely removed from our complicity in the slave trade. We simply do not care yet we have the audacity to have excessive expectations of diaspora blacks? Bye girl. Black Americans have their own culture and heritage. Yes, they are descendants from the motherland but they are NOT Africans. They do not owe you anything, so stop asking.

    Also, let us not sit here and act like there are a plethora of places on the African continent with proper amenities to organize and host concerts of the magnitude as Beyonce’s. Let us not please. Again, I am born and bred in West Africa (Cameroon and naija). I am very well traveled in the region and I can literally count the number of venues that can support a large scale concert on one hand. Even the ones that do are poorly organized and you have to deal with shady organizers and poor security. I recently attended a show in Ivory Coast in a superb venue but the organization was a total mess.

    Most of you on the internet who are always trying to come for anyone who is critical of Africans are usually African immigrants abroad or kids of African immigrants with your Western passports, utterly clueless about the realities in the motherland. Instead of blaming others, how about to you build YOUR community of Africans? Instead of worrying about Beyonce’s concert why not worry about the fact that YOU have never attended the concert of a local African artist in an African venue?

    Let me ask the author of this article: How many African artists’ music have you LEGALLY purchased on itunes?? How many African artists have you financially supported? Worry about that good sis, and I am done. Africans exhaust the frick outta me I tell you.

    END OF RANT!!

    • Jessi Nicky

      You make good points in your write up but if you really think that the troubles of the continent are solely caused by it. By that I refer to the limited knowledge Africans have about Slavery as well as your view which may even offend some African Americans by calling them none African then I think you are mistaken I totally agree though that a touring Beyonce or anyone else is the least of Africa’s challenges right now

    • Jessi Nicky

      You make good points in your write up but if you really think that the troubles of the continent are solely caused by it. By that I refer to the limited knowledge Africans have about Slavery as well as your view which may even offend some African Americans by calling them none African then I think you are mistaken I totally agree though that a touring Beyonce or anyone else is the least of Africa’s challenges right now

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  • Nia Laing

    What is all this talk about “required pilgrimage” to Africa and African-Americans owe Africa nothing? I encourage a lot of you to brush up on your reading comprehension. The author of the essay spoke nothing of black artists NEEDING to go to Africa so their love for their blackness can be valid. What he is saying is that black artists and artists influenced by African culture should think about touring in African countries because #1, Africans are huge fans of certain western artists and would pay to see them, #2, they have the venues, safety parameters, and height of luxury to appease celebrities, and #3 if they love African culture so much and are influenced by it, why is it that there are no tour dates for Africa? Paying homage to whatever influences you is a nice thing to do (and artists do it often). It is not necessary, but is a suggestion. It isn’t also like these artists are not in demand – they are loved all over the globe. The problem is this disgusting stereotype that the whole of Africa is third-world and that is untrue. Another thing – if third-world is an issue, what the hell is wrong with performing for less money than you would make at Philips Arena in Atlanta? Is it seriously that much of an issue for a person who makes millions/billions? To the person who says doesn’t Africa has bigger problems to worry about, so you mean to say certain parts of the world dealing with certain issues aren’t allowed to want entertainment? I’m also annoyed at the comments about black American culture and black Americans, being apart from African culture and Africans. As a black American, I have a deep respect for the continent mainly because I am a descendant of the African people. It just pains me to see a lack of unity between all people of the African diaspora. Thanks to the writer of this essay for bringing up a much-ignored issue.

    • Marie Amon

      thank you Nia. Everything you said is exactly my point… we in Africa are just good a public as anywhere in the world. All these talks about africans having to worry about bigger problems, doesn’t even make sense.

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  • Micah Chudleigh

    As much as this article makes a very important and untalked about point, really it’s not the artists fault. It actually comes down to the tour managers/tour company in charge of the tour that decide which artists go where. Usually these are Middle Aged, rich white men that all have the preconception that every African country is a third-world country.

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  • DarkChild

    Being black is not equal to being African. Africa is not a color, Africa is a home to a people who believe community is more important than the individual, people who know that materialism is not the hallmark for progress…I was born, raised and live in Africa. Some of my fellow Africans are white and some are of Asian descent.

    • Viv

      hmmm i disagree with you here,Africa has a color and that color is black..

    • Viv

      hmmm i disagree with you here,Africa has a color and that color is black..

      • DarkChild

        So the Algerians, Moroccans etc up north are not Africa? How about my best friend who is Chinese and married a black woman and they have children together? Please, your statement is simply an excuse to find one compartment in which to categorise Africa. Just like America and Europe, Africa is rich with diversity! The people you’ll find here were not dumped here because of their color.

        • Viv

          Dnt get me wrong love,but everyone belongs somewhere or came from somewhere…your best friend’s children are African”thats only because they cnt be accepted in china because of their colour”but if u are really African then i dnt have to explain to you that you follow ur father’s culture and tradition not mother..
          As for Algerians and Moroccan etc..lets be honest here living in Africa doesn’t make you African..we all know it and they know it that why they dnt fully consider themselves Africans.
          Come on recently Moroccans have been killing black Africans because of their colour…if we were all one, colour wouldn’t matter at all.South Sudanese used to be segregated by the Northerners because of colour.
          A South African lady called black people “Monkeys” on their own land…you know wat dia,wen i fly out and i get insulted by someone,i take it coz i know ts not home but wen i get home i can’t handle that…
          Africa is the only thing we black people can call “ours”,a place we can call home…
          Ask urself why a person from Algeria can’t proudly say I’m an African..
          People in Africa”who aint black”were not dumped but just forced themselves on ur us coz i can gladly help them locate where they came from.
          Black people are being chased from all the corners of the world,imagine if u came home and home is filled with the colour that has been terrorizing you with an excuse that they are one us.
          Qn. When someone says I’m from Africa,what color comes to ur mind?Black/White or Black and White.

          • DarkChild

            Qn: When somebody says I’m from America, is “red Indian” the first color that comes to your mind? When someone says “I’m from Australia”, is Aborigen the first thing that comes to your mind? I would say the person who thinks African means black does not know Africa! Let me tell you something, I was born and raised in an African city, but a good number of my school holidays I would go to the rural side where my grandparents where, and where you will find the true “African way of life”….there I used to play with 4 white kids that lived on an adjacent farm. Those kids spoke Shona fluently (an African language), we used to heard cattle together, drink milky white water from forest springs (if you know what African water looks like), eat African wild fruits like matamba and matohwe – those white kids to me are way more Africa than Beyonce, because they can actually live in Africa, be 1 with the African environment and still be proud to be in Africa. They have more Africa in their hearts than any black-American, because although English was their first language, they made every effort to learn Shona so that can speak with fellow Africans. Racists will always be everywhere – America, Asia, Europe and Africa, but they do not define who we are and what the standard for society is. I have Chinesse, Indian, Libyan and European friends here in Zimbabwe, and they call themselves African – proud of it too. These guys have actually learnt to speak my African language, eat African food like sadza (when come over to my house that’s what they eat)! So you see, I’m speaking from things that I have experienced and still experience! Next time when you think of Africa, think Ubuntu, not black, because that what’s Africa is, community, respect and regard for all people regardless of color or status.Heck, some of these black-Amricans’ skin becoming whiter than the Queen of England herself!!!

          • Viv

            How can i explain this…trying to learn how to live as African doesn’t make you an African..
            We have white people who have been given our names but that doesn’t change who they are.they try so much to live like Africans..hmm but there is that unspoken truth..Lets face it Africans dnt segregate thats why i get you right now.We live in this bubble that everyone can be welcomed.We are born with a smile and everyone who smiles back is a good person,which is one of the reasons we have been manipulated countless times,one of the reasons our people have been taken and one of the reasons we have been robbed.
            I get that you see them as part of the community,coz u are an African..u are naturally born like that…We are all like but everything changes wen one hot day you decide to go to the city to have ice cream and you see someone’s dad been abused by the same people who smile back at.Everything changes wen u go out to have lunch and find there places for white people and black people.Everything changes wen u have a white boss who keeps “referring you to…. you black people”
            You used to milk cows with the white kids but who didnt play with white kids back then,they knew our language,they seemed to be home but dnt forget those are kids.At that stage you are still innocent and still think one day you will marry a prince.
            But wen u grow up, reality hits you big, that’s wen u realize that after the white kids played with u they were scolded by their parents for playing with a black kid.
            Wen i see black Americans,i see my people….i see my colour..i know they think they have their own culture going on but their attitude,the talking back at someone,that is all African”in a modern way for them”.
            Let me give you an example,i come from Uganda..born and raised in Uganda..”Had to point out that I’m an African”
            Wen it rains there is that one thing African kids do,that is run out naked and play in the rain”i dnt know if u remember doing it or not”
            If we are to be given a chance to do it right now with out anyone judging you of cos,
            All “Black” Africans will undressing and play in the rain,Black Americans will take a minute to think about it coz the western culture in them but will still join because it is their color in the rain and most white people wont join because they think it is uncivilized,and those who will it will be because they want to experience the feeling or they think they will look cool doing it.
            What makes you African:-The stories grandma used to tell around the fire,the rituals u do wen u are young to stop the rain, the different things u believed in while growing up”signs of bad luck or death ahead”

          • DarkChild

            Viv, it appears that wherever you live now you have a bad experience as an African. Well, I don’t! 1stly, the slave trade thrived mostly because of tribalism. Stronger militant African tribes would raid weaker tribes, capture their children and sell them in exchange for goods like cloth, wine etc to slave ships. 2ndly, I still am friends with those white mates of mine! One of them was in class with me till 12th grade! I know very well about past injustices like colonialism, but our understanding here is that that was an evil done by a generation of that time, not the people I’m friends with today. So I refuse to perpetuate the cycle of victim-hood. My wife and I are actually the youngest in a leadership team in a church that is 70% white here in Zim. I grew up in a mixed neighborhood, went to a mixed race school, and now am part of a mixed race friendship circle…to my memory, I have only met 2 racist whites, but that does not give me the right to say the other dozens of white people whom I know and am friends with are also racist. If you would like to know, between 1980 and 1984 (before I was born) my country suffered black on black racism which killed more black people than the war against colonialism. Search for “Gukurahundi”. Racism is not a white people problem, it’s a people problem. Even Shaka Zulu, the great Zulu king, believed that other African tribes apart from his Zulu tribe had to be subdued and colonised, hence you had Mfecane movement – when Africans migrated en-mass from the South going up north…this was way before the colonization of Africa. We were exploited in colonization because when the Europeans came, they saw small warring tribes that couldn’t unite against a common enemy. Slavery was not ended in Africa, because Africans made good money selling Africans. If you have heard the word “Muranda” you will know that before slavery of Africa by the west, there was slavery of Africans by Africans. We were manipulated into slavery because we couldn’t protect our territories and citizens. In as much as you have whites here who are proud to be African, you also have blacks who are in the West and don’t want nothing to do with Africa! Africa is not a factory where black-skinned people are made, Africa is a diverse community of people of all races and cultures! Even I had to learn how to be African – hence we had to let our grannies tell us stories, proverbs and idioms…so we could know Ubuntu!

          • Viv

            First,not all white people are bad BUT that doesnt mean we shud hold hands and sing kumbaya with them.I’m lucky i have never been a victim to segragation from white people but that doesnt mean it’s not happening out there.
            Me, you and someone out there have been lucky but that doesnt mean everyone has…
            I would feel very bad and selfish to go back to my house thinking everything is fine out there just because it is fine with me.
            Just because ur white mates are good,it doesnt mean thr kind is all good..Honestly i would like to ask you a question;What gets to your mind when u watch a video of a black person being shot,When you look at the photos of African kids being slaughtered like chicken,When you read people’s comments of whites people calling black people all sort of names.The tennage video of white kids talking about wanting slavery back..Do you turn off ur computer and be like”aint my problem,as long as the people around me are good”
            And you giving me a history lesson of what happened in the past makes me wonder if you really know that its still happening.
            All I’m saying”my own opinion”they can come visit,this is Africa we will gladly welcome them as long as they are will to go back after thr vacation.They shouldn’t own land”i know it sounds mean but yes”
            Right now they are good but that doesnt guarantee that their kids,grand Kids,great grand kids will be good as well.I have a strong feeling that one day black people will return back home..but let there be home to return to.Take a look at South Africa,i think it would have been a better place if whites had returned home..yes at that time black people were trying to a nice “Communitywith all races” but look how our black people are being treated on thr own land.White people think they own they South African.Those whites aint proud to be Africans,they are just too comfortable because of our weather,food and way of living.
            The day you will know that those people are part of us,will be wen a war breaks..a car will come,pick them up and no one will stay back for you or anyone.
            To me Africa is a big oak tree,and African people,culture and traditions are the roots,white people dnt belong to any tribe making not part of the tree whereas black people in the west or out there are just roots broken from the tree but belong to tribe somewhr.”i hope this example explains what i have been trying to put out for days now”

          • Viv

            How can i explain this…trying to learn how to live as African doesn’t make you an African..
            We have white people who have been given our names but that doesn’t change who they are.they try so much to live like Africans..hmm but there is that unspoken truth..Lets face it Africans dnt segregate thats why i get you right now.We live in this bubble that everyone can be welcomed.We are born with a smile and everyone who smiles back is a good person,which is one of the reasons we have been manipulated countless times,one of the reasons our people have been taken and one of the reasons we have been robbed.
            I get that you see them as part of the community,coz u are an African..u are naturally born like that…We are all like but everything changes wen one hot day you decide to go to the city to have ice cream and you see someone’s dad been abused by the same people who smile back at.Everything changes wen u go out to have lunch and find there places for white people and black people.Everything changes wen u have a white boss who keeps “referring you to…. you black people”
            You used to milk cows with the white kids but who didnt play with white kids back then,they knew our language,they seemed to be home but dnt forget those are kids.At that stage you are still innocent and still think one day you will marry a prince.
            But wen u grow up, reality hits you big, that’s wen u realize that after the white kids played with u they were scolded by their parents for playing with a black kid.
            Wen i see black Americans,i see my people….i see my colour..i know they think they have their own culture going on but their attitude,the talking back at someone,that is all African”in a modern way for them”.
            Let me give you an example,i come from Uganda..born and raised in Uganda..”Had to point out that I’m an African”
            Wen it rains there is that one thing African kids do,that is run out naked and play in the rain”i dnt know if u remember doing it or not”
            If we are to be given a chance to do it right now with out anyone judging you of cos,
            All “Black” Africans will undressing and play in the rain,Black Americans will take a minute to think about it coz the western culture in them but will still join because it is their color in the rain and most white people wont join because they think it is uncivilized,and those who will it will be because they want to experience the feeling or they think they will look cool doing it.
            What makes you African:-The stories grandma used to tell around the fire,the rituals u do wen u are young to stop the rain, the different things u believed in while growing up”signs of bad luck or death ahead”

  • Trang Nguyen

    Just a tip for you. First, I think it’s great that you are striving to be in the written medium. However, I think as a writer you have a responsibility to study your craft. You have a responsibility to uphold great written form. I had a difficult time getting through the first few paragraphs because of the grammatical errors.

  • Kyla McMillan

    I agree with most of this, but I see that you included a picture of Nikki Minaj who was just in South Africa in March. I thought it was great that she came to Johannesburg, so I wanted to give credit where it’s due.

  • Kyla McMillan

    I agree with most of this, but I see that you included a picture of Nikki Minaj who was just in South Africa in March. I thought it was great that she came to Johannesburg, so I wanted to give credit where it’s due.

  • Fee Rog

    Can they afford to go see Beyonce? I can’t not even with income tax money. Really let’s not feed into this negativity . This is all about money at the end of the day. Some places in Africa barely have clean drinking water and proper sewer systems for all people. Africa need to worry about those innocent girls being held captive for two years at the hands of Boko Haram. Worry about how Suddan people are dying at Sea trying to escape 3000 last year . Last but not least the people being kidnapped in the dessert by Arabics stealing body parts. When you think about all that plus the HIV…. Beyonce ain’t nobody!

    • fiona

      This is exactly what the writer is talking about. Hey American, why don’t you worry about Donald trump, the people living in trailer parks. America needs to worry about the drug addicts, gangs, how about those innocent boys being shot by the police, you don’t even have clean water to drink ( Flint), your country is deeply divided on every issue, ISIS. When you think about all this plus the homegrown terrorist problem…… Beyonce ain’t nobody!

      • Fee Rog

        Look until all Africans get that we are all one blood, stop trying to divide ourselves by countries , tribes, and religions we will always have these conversations. We have some of the same issues here in the USA as in AFRICA don’t get me wrong. Although what I’ve studied is that some Africans just don’t take to the African Americans that well, just look at Liberia history.My point is why are we talking about this stupid issues? What are you doing to help the people? I want to work for Doctors without broders. Be a school teacher, I want to help. But will I be received well, open arms? I speak from the heart not malisously . My comment was for the government , not ordinary people

      • Fee Rog

        Look until all Africans get that we are all one blood, stop trying to divide ourselves by countries , tribes, and religions we will always have these conversations. We have some of the same issues here in the USA as in AFRICA don’t get me wrong. Although what I’ve studied is that some Africans just don’t take to the African Americans that well, just look at Liberia history.My point is why are we talking about this stupid issues? What are you doing to help the people? I want to work for Doctors without broders. Be a school teacher, I want to help. But will I be received well, open arms? I speak from the heart not malisously . My comment was for the government , not ordinary people

    • Marie Amon

      So you really think Africa is the only place with problems? the only difference between Africa and the western world is Public relations! The western world never makes a promotion of their problems as it does for Africa. Stop looking at Africa as a poor land with problems. Africa is plural. It’s multi dimensional. Africa needs to think about Boko Haram? what about America and Europe about Isis? don’ they go to concerts because Isis is posing bombs in Paris? Worrying about Sudan and the refugees? What about the mexicans crossing the US borders everyday? should the americans stop attending concerts because of that? Oh no clean water for us? Yes because Flint Michigan is number one in terms of mineral water. Point is, everybody is entitled to good entertainment.

      • Fee Rog

        No I’m more concerned with major , issues that affect Africans all over the world. I’m more concerned about all the people that died at sea this weekend .I more interested in the positive rather than the negative . With all you stated above why are you really concerned when their are bigger issues . Obviously I’m interested in the things that happens to Africans all around the world. We as a people always looking to be accepted and respected by other cultures, but don’t respect each other. We don’t see each other as one blood that’s why we are last across the world

        • Jessi Nicky

          I think you have a good heart but your initial assertions with a disease ridden continent is a show that you don’t know enough about the continent. I travelled to New York recently. If I took a photo of some areas in Harlem or the ghastly underground system and claimed that was America that would be wrong. Equally I think when you fill your write up with wholly negative stereotypes of Africa that’s just as bad. I do agree that there are more important issues to focus on though. And these issues are non of what you’ve mentioned as the ills in the continent

          • Fee Rog

            I’m concerned with the well being of all Africans. From the Congo, to Liberia , to Sudden. There are slums, and projects all over where we are separated by class and race. I want to work with Doctors Without Borders I love my people. When I’m done being a mother I will travel , and help others 🙌🏿

  • Fee Rog

    Last time I checked, I am African, I just live in America . Of course all cultures are inspired by the beautiful mother land, you should be honored …..This article shows videos and pictures of US artist , in Africa. But what about that clean drinking water, Jay z provided, the schools Oprah and Serenna provided? It seems to me you have you worried about the wrong things, with all that’s going on in your country ….

    • Kofi Levermann

      So there was no clean drinking water before Jay-Z came?
      Without Serena and Oprah there were no schools? To be fair those projects did well, but are drops in the ocean.
      Africans also drive Lamborghini (my Ex-gf has one) and Ferrari, a Porsche or Benz is as common as it is in the USA.

      Of course they can effort to see Beyonce, or do you think everyone in Africa is poor and needs help? Even if only 0,1% of all Ghanaians for example, would be able to pay the ticket (which is way to low) it would still account to 250.000 potential visitors..

      PS: No disrespect, but I think being black doesn’t make one African… just like Trump is not European.

    • Marie Amon

      What is it about the fact that when we are talking about bringing entertainment to Africa, some people always bring about subject of poverty??? Africa is multi dimensional. There are poor people there, there are rich people there and everything in between. and yes there are even people that can afford concert tickets!

  • All African diaspora, scattered around the world, whether in the Americas or Europe carry that “rhythmic gene in our blood.” Yes, the soulfulness was birthed out of Africa but to lay claim that Africa has a monopoly on the musical genius of hip hop or rap is erroneous. The black American or African American has innovated the inherited musical gift to unparalleled levels and opened a space of opportunity for others to follow even Mother Africa.

    Yet, on the same token, let’s not forget that African Americans as even Africans still have a negative perception of Africa due to the denigrating image perpetuated by white owned media outlets. This negative perception will dissuade many from coming to Africa.

    • Kitty Karnivalle

      And the same thing has happened in reverse. The media’s devaluing of black lives is a trend across all locations, black americans are not exempt.

      • Mka

        Generalizations are tricky. I, for one, do not think poorly of African-Americans. I also strongly feel that African-Americans are one of the great influencers of pop culture. If you have met one or two Africans who have no appreciation for the experiences of African Americans, then those are the opinions of the one or two Africans you met.

        • Kitty Karnivalle

          I’m saying that the disrespect is happening on both sides. With poor media representations of blackness (globally), there is a lot of undiscussed disrespect. I’m noting that while black american culture is copied, its done so globally without a true understanding of our culture and our experiences, and thats unfair to us. And when it happens in reverse it is unfair as well. We must reach point of mutual love and respect.

    • Mka

      I see your point. While I don’t think that African-Americans have Africans to thank for their culture (and because you are descendants of Africans, I personally don’t think you need our permission to wear septums or ankara clothes), I do think that it would be great if artists in general stopped acting like Africa doesn’t exist. For goodness sake, we are a whole continent! It isn’t a “world” tour if your ignoring a whole continent! 😔I’m not even South African, but, unlike the author, I would be grateful if Beyonce toured at least that one country!! I guess the only African country that will be getting a star of that magnitude will be Wakanda.

  • Andrea Lynn Leggins

    But why is it so important for her to perform there ?? If a artist gives money or go visit why are you so upset about them performing ?? I would think them giving back would make yall happy but I guess not. I love the country but no one is obligated to preform nor visit. Just my opinion. Be blessed

    • Jessi Nicky

      Haha Africa isn’t a country mate. Just my truth.

      • Andrea Lynn Leggins

        I stand corrected. Continent

    • Jessi Nicky

      Haha Africa isn’t a country mate. Just my truth.

  • Jackson Pollard

    I will just say research more! You say you’ve done your research, how are the artist’s you pictured at the bottom of the article immersing their self in the culture.

    I know why you’re trying to say South Africa “doesn’t count”, but shouldn’t it.
    Bieber, Minaj, Rihanna, Beyonce, Kendrick Lamar have all toured there.
    And it hasn’t been awhile since anyone toured there: Nicki Minaj who you posted above was just there in March. (When was this article written)

    You show MJ as one of your “cultural immersions”, he toured in Tunisia once in 1996 and then the other 5 dates, were where…….South Africa.

    Beyonce had a concert tour stop in Ethiopia in 2007 (that was 9 years ago but she was there)
    I know you said you don’t want to have the Beyhive upset with you but they probably will be since you didn’t research that.

    How meetings work:
    The tour’s Promoters/Entertainment Companies and Managers discuss bids they have received for the shows/tours, government restrictions for those areas, what the demographics are in areas, stadium size, population size, fan base, have they had issues with other shows there and cost of tickets. Having a large stadium does not always mean you get a concert. States/Cities/Countries have to be able to afford the promoter’s fees, artist’s fees and any other fees the state/local/country’s government charge. Even in America not all states get a concert, sometimes some of them NEVER do. Not many concerts happening in Utah, the Dakotas, Wyoming.

    I would say ask your local promoters/entertainment companies first to see if they have even submitted a bid for the shows of the above people you mentioned and was it a “real” bid.

    • Marie Amon

      nice. thanks for all the valuable infos

  • justifyd

    So true. Personally i dont follow into all this unapologetically black stuff. I like people being proud of where they come from but it seems like its going away from being proud to shoving it in people faces and downing other races.

    And i agree. It stupid for artist to say how proud they are to be black and how much they support africa but then to neglect a whole continent of fans? Same with people in general who constantly talk about how “African” they are but dont know anything about African culut besides dashikis, braids and the clothes

  • Rave About Africa

    A very good article. We agree that any artists ‘World Tour’ should not miss out the second largest continent in the world…For this to happen there are a few myths that need to be dispelled about Africa e.g. the food, wealth, poverty, safety, accommodation, music, politics etc..

    Yes – Africa has huge concert venues that will take over 30 thousand people.
    Yes – People in Africa will pay for concert ticket to see people they love and admire in concert.
    Yes – Africa hosts some of the most expensive lavish hotels and restaurants than those in US & Europe.
    Yes – Some of the African artists are paid more to do a concert in Africa than artists are paid for their shows in the US or Europe.
    Yes – Some of the articles about Politics in Africa are actually ‘Politricks’ from the western media.
    Yes – African Countries will treat you like royalty and ensure your safety throughout your visit.
    Nigeria, Ghana, Gambia, Senegal and Ivory Coast are to name but a few African Countries that will welcome you with open arms.

    We arrange for groups to visit Africa every year and to say ‘it changes you’ is an understatement. For an artists it must be hard to sing, write, speak or embrace a culture without experiencing it for oneself first. We have just returned from Africa after hosting a Reggae Festival, this included Artists who had never been to Africa before.

    Unfortunately to encourage the diaspora to visit Africa is a very hard task because of the belief systems they have engrained, as stated previously mainly from western educational systems and the biased media. We will continue in our quest because we believe times will change and very soon. It will just take just a few to start coming and the rest will follow..

    • Marie Amon

      thank you Rave. Sick and tired about all those views about Africa; Yes we do have our problems but so does America, Russia, England, China and so on. Why is Africa always reduced to its poverty and misery. I have understood a long time ago that the way we africans and the rest of the world see ourselves, has a lot to do with the way we are portrayed in the media. No one will talk about the Africa that I know. Vibrant, dynamic, with many countries economically rising and changing. Yes we have many people willing to pay the price for entertainment, because they can afford it! Yes there is a huge demand for music shows from music stars of the world. Why should we be content with anything less? because this is Africa???

  • Rave About Africa

    A very good article. We agree that any artists ‘World Tour’ should not miss out the second largest continent in the world…For this to happen there are a few myths that need to be dispelled about Africa e.g. the food, wealth, poverty, safety, accommodation, music, politics etc..

    Yes – Africa has huge concert venues that will take over 30 thousand people.
    Yes – People in Africa will pay for concert ticket to see people they love and admire in concert.
    Yes – Africa hosts some of the most expensive lavish hotels and restaurants than those in US & Europe.
    Yes – Some of the African artists are paid more to do a concert in Africa than artists are paid for their shows in the US or Europe.
    Yes – Some of the articles about Politics in Africa are actually ‘Politricks’ from the western media.
    Yes – African Countries will treat you like royalty and ensure your safety throughout your visit.
    Nigeria, Ghana, Gambia, Senegal and Ivory Coast are to name but a few African Countries that will welcome you with open arms.

    We arrange for groups to visit Africa every year and to say ‘it changes you’ is an understatement. For an artists it must be hard to sing, write, speak or embrace a culture without experiencing it for oneself first. We have just returned from Africa after hosting a Reggae Festival, this included Artists who had never been to Africa before.

    Unfortunately to encourage the diaspora to visit Africa is a very hard task because of the belief systems they have engrained, as stated previously mainly from western educational systems and the biased media. We will continue in our quest because we believe times will change and very soon. It will just take just a few to start coming and the rest will follow..

  • Jr ushanga

    Again Marie Amon, who is a fool between me & you, when you are paying double an artist’s worth just to scam your people HUN!?!

  • Jr ushanga

    Again Marie Amon, who is a fool between me & you, when you are paying double an artist’s worth just to scam your people HUN!?!

    • Marie Amon

      some people pay $30 to go see Bieber on concert. Other people will pay $300 for the same Bieber concert. That’s just the way it is. that’s called the market law. HUN!

  • Brandon Pono

    Can I ask why you’ve written this article as if you are African? You used “we” several times. You are British, no?

  • Brandon Pono

    Can I ask why you’ve written this article as if you are African? You used “we” several times. You are British, no?

  • Jr ushanga

    Marie Amon, these artists do not programme their own tours, their are sponsored, paid by political stooges to promote their financiers products & nothing for your eyes. If these millions you are clapping about were used to promote health, education, eradication of hunger in your neighborhood…believe you me these artists shall flock to Africa. Morality, how do you dance on your neighbor’s tomb!?!

  • Missbeanz

    I agree with the sentiment, but do have a question:

    I don’t really listen to any of the artists mentioned, but I do go to shows often. The last big artist I saw was Queen + Adam Lambert. I paid almost $300 for my ONE ticket. Are there enough people in those countries willing to shell out that much to see someone? Enough to fill an entire stadium? If it’s only for the elite, then the elite can fly to see the artists elsewhere. No point in watching your favorite artist come to town only to discover you’re too broke to go. Believe me, I know the feeling!

    • Marie Amon

      We are receiving DJ David Guetta on the 1st of June in Abidjan Cote d’Ivoire for a 30 minutes show. He will be paid $500 THOUSAND, I repeat $500 THOUSAND, for a 30 minutes show, when David Guetta is paid around $200 000 for a whole night show in Ibiza.

      CHRIS BROWN Came in Abidjan Last year and gave a 2 hour show at our main STADIUM. Tickets were running from $30 all the way to $300 if you wanted a VIP Pass. The stadium capacity? 40 000. It was sold out.

      KIM K came in for 2 days in Abidjan just for a hand wave to the crowd, filling 2 main Concert halls back to back, for a Hand shake, and made around $2 millions just for showing up!

      Even a niche artist like MARCUS MILLER (famous jazz artist) is coming over to Abidjan and is giving a show that sells for $90 a ticket.

      Some cities like LUANDA in ANGOLA, DAKAR in SENEGAL or even ABIDJAN where I live, are some of the most expensive cities in the world. Yes in the world. If you want to live in Luanda for example, you will easily spend A thousand dollar for a Studio appartment, the same way you would for cities like Paris, London or NY. And yes all those cities can ( and for most have) receive major artists and expect them to fill stadiums.
      Some cities like Libreville in Gabon have already received major stars like Beyonce and Jay-Z for concerts shows, where they have made millions.

      My point is, international artists should not underestimate the huge potential that Africa represents as far money making.
      The major cities in Africa like Dakar, Abidjan, Lagos, Accra, Marrakech, Luanda, Nairobi, Kigali… have all facilities to receive those big stars. they have the logistic for the security, and yes there is a crowd that can actually pay for the high price tickets. Just ask Belgian singer STROMAE when he toured in more than 10 cities in Africa this year

      • ayiteygmailcom

        Here is what is a shame about all the facts that you mention-that we are willing to shell out this kind of money when we have needs that are pressing, dire and deadly. Our priorities as a continent is misplaced. We have money like you say in one breath but we are poor. We have presidents and governments carrying tin hats begging to money from the rich countries to fund us. When we stop begging, we can start enjoying. For now this notion that somehow we need to match the West is juvenile and shows how are priorities are so misplaced.

        • Marie Amon

          First off, We are not willing to shell out this money. Private companies that make their money legally, shell out this money as a promotional tool for their own business. WE pay for the ticket to go see them if we like them. it’s the same everywhere in the world. It shocks you because it’s happening in Africa. It’s happening just the same in western countries. companies are spending millions of dollars for major sports events like the superbowl, nobody telling them their priorities are misplaced. Why don’t they spend this money in the health system, where if you are not rich or insured you can’t go to a hospital.
          A company like ORANGE in Cote d’Ivoire makes more than $3 million a day in revenues. Why would they be ashamed of spending half a million dollar for an artist, knowing they will benefit even more from the outcome??? like I say, Africa is not about misery only.

      • ayiteygmailcom

        Here is what is a shame about all the facts that you mention-that we are willing to shell out this kind of money when we have needs that are pressing, dire and deadly. Our priorities as a continent is misplaced. We have money like you say in one breath but we are poor. We have presidents and governments carrying tin hats begging to money from the rich countries to fund us. When we stop begging, we can start enjoying. For now this notion that somehow we need to match the West is juvenile and shows how are priorities are so misplaced.

      • Jr ushanga

        Marie Amon, these artists do not programme their own tours, their are sponsored, paid by political stooges to promote their financiers products & nothing for your eyes. If these millions you are clapping about were used to promote health, education, eradication of hunger in your neighborhood…believe you me these artists shall flock to Africa. Morality, how do you dance on your neighbor’s tomb!?!

        Again Marie Amon, who is a fool between me & you, when you are paying double an artist’s worth just to scam your people HUN!?!

        • Marie Amon

          You must be the fool. In your original post you were laughing your head off on how Artists were not coming to Africa and people could not afford to pay tickets. I just proved you otherwise. You asked how many african artists were touring in Africa, I showed you that many artists were doing so. You are talking about how these big concerts are financed by politics to promote what financial products??? any evidence of that? The concerts that I know for most parts are financed by PRIVATE corporations whose main goal is to take advantage of the promotional outcomes and make profits just the same it works in western countries. Example??? David Guetta sponsored by Orange!!! Akon sponsored by MOOV 2 phone companies.
          Those concerts are promoted by private business who are making money organizing concerts, that’s their business, just like any other business.
          Big Corporate companies just do the same everywhere in the world. They are in for profits. Isn’t it what you were talking about in your original post ?
          “Africans want people to love them, well love is something you don’t demand but command. These artists you are bashing, are not social or humanitarian associations, there are money-making industries”
          Well we giving them money to come in to do these concerts so that we can enjoy ourselves too, we are not looking for love here are we?
          Now it’s not going your way, you are all of a sudden concerned by health and education????
          Who are you to decide on what a PRIVATE company, earning its money legally, should spend their money on??? Is this their job to spend their money and education and health? Does it always have to be about Health and education just because we are talking about Africa?
          They have departments and foundations dedicated to that, and they spend millions already on health and education, they did not wait for you.
          If they want to spend their marketing dollars on concerts, where exactly is your problem? When and if you are watching the superbowl why don’t you demand that all those big corporations that spend millions of dollar on a 30 second commercial, forward all this money to health and education in America? Please let’s be serious for a second. We are all entitled to the good things in life. There is misery and poverty in western countries as well. Don’t reduce africa to the misery that you see in the media.

          • Jr ushanga

            Then WHAT D-FUCK YOU COMPLAINING & CRYING about if all is well HUN!?!

          • Marie Amon

            lol I was expecting that one. When there is no more argument, then comes the fuck argument. Did you hear us complain to you? DId I ask you for money to go see a show? show me where

          • Jr ushanga

            Unapologetically Black But Won’t Tour In Africa…Hmmm

            Read the headline title before opening it to comment!

          • Marie Amon

            I read the title all right. But I was responding to you and your condescending ways about Africa.

      • Jr ushanga

        Just listen to yourself (GOD ALMIGHTY). You should be ashamed, learn show business & economy for the least, you pay David Guetta $500,000 for half an hour as a scam, for him you just a waste of time (a disturbance) because in Ibiza he gets $200,000 a night, playing everynight mind you! Get over it

        • Marie Amon

          And you should learn to stick to your gun. Not coming here looking like a fool saying one thing on one post and the exact opposite on the next. You made a point saying that artists are money machines and Africa should stop behaving like spoilt children. Now that I showed you that we are playing the game all right, you are throwing the humanitarian card at us, and taking offense??? well HUN you can’t have it both ways.
          Learn showbiz and economy? LMAO. I am the only one giving you figures here when you are just coming over throwing infos you don t have a clue about, and making random accusations. Why don’t you answer the questions if you are such a genious.
          If a private company, that earns over $400 million a year wants to spend half a million on an artist for a concert as a promotion tool, explain what part of it exactly is the scam?
          Do you know the fallouts for them? Do you think they are so moronic they will spend that much money without gaining from it?
          If we ‘re such a disturbance, why did he accept to come?
          After all he can make that much money playing 3 nights in Ibiza right?
          Why is it not a scam for Ibiza to pay $200 000 for David Guetta to play a night? If you want to have the last word you can have it. But please come up with serious arguments backed up by facts, when you want to talk about something that gets over your head.

      • Bpo

        Many of these commenters are unfortunately ignorant to the power of the African dollar.

      • Kofi Levermann

        Chris Brown also got 1 million Dollar for a concert in Ghana 2013 sponsored by RLG…

        Your point is valid. There is a financial gain for artists and no excuse to not perform! I still think those artists are overpaid.

        • Kitty Karnivalle

          Chris Brown isn’t that big a name as Beyonce though….she’s averaging 5.4 million per concert right now, and many people were unable to afford her ticket prices in the U.S. but she’s still selling out stadiums.

          • Mka

            I actually had to look that one up. While there are African airlines that are poorly rated, its not fair to say that many are (inferring more than the median). And, seeing that it’s unlikely that the tour would include all 50-something countries in Africa (if it ever happened, I’m thinking just 3-5 countries would benefit), travel logistics wouldn’t be as great a hurdle as your trying to make it sound, especially since some highly rated international airlines fly these routes. The logistics team could work something out IF they wanted to. Of course, there are other problems. Like ticket prices. (Do they REALLY do up to $300??!!)

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            The article specifies that just visiting 1 country doesn’t count as visiting africa, so I assumed the artist was striving or at least 50% of the continent to reccieve the artists, and I’m thinking of travel not just for the artists, but for the entire tour, roadies, dancers, etc. AND the fans who travel to see the artist. And if you compare the ratings of african airlines to European airlines ect. they do not fare well. And with the culture of fear that Western nations are living in regarding airline safety, that can be a huge deal, so with a crew of 200+ people, travel IS a hurdle, and thats an extra inconvenience for an artist seeking to branch out and tour in underrepresented locations. (And ticket prices for Beyonce? You’re lucky with a 200-300 ticket, cause some were in the thousands. If you want big artists, big artists are not cheap.)

          • Kofi Levermann

            Ethiopian Airlines is a International Carrier that is well awarded and can be chartered. They offer intercontinental service just like South African or Kenya or Namibia Airways is connecting many African nations with a very reliable service!
            Those combined you would reach almost all African Nations.

            Additionally, Emirates, United, Lufthansa, Brussels, British Airways connect many African nations with Europe/America. There is basically no excuse.

            Africa can be divided in 5 sections:
            Northern, Werstern, Central, Southern, and Eastern.
            If artists would only pic 2-3 nations in each reagion, it would be fair enough.

            Example:
            Northern: Marocco, Egypt
            Western: Senegal, Cote d’Ivore, Ghana, Nigeria
            Central: Cameroon, Gabon, Zambia
            Southern: Namibia, South Africa,
            Eastern: Uganda, Kenya/Tanzania, Ethiopia

            Done deal.

            PS: Even WestCoast “hopper” like Gambia Bird (unfortunately terminated service because of financial crisis caused by Ebola fear) was very well and flew to Europe aswell (I used them more than once).

          • Jessi Nicky

            Why would you make such an assumption that the artist would have to visit 50%of the continent? Do they have to do that anywhere else? I find your assertions about air travel deeply troubling.As it appears your sources of information are solely from the media. As someone that works in environments that require strict safety levels I will advise that you may want to research beyond the popular media. Also I’ve been to Beyonce concert costing £70 as the average Brit would not be able to afford more. Saying that I think there are other priorities for Africa. And people particularly African Americans touring the continent in my opinion is not one

          • Jessi Nicky

            Why would you make such an assumption that the artist would have to visit 50%of the continent? Do they have to do that anywhere else? I find your assertions about air travel deeply troubling.As it appears your sources of information are solely from the media. As someone that works in environments that require strict safety levels I will advise that you may want to research beyond the popular media. Also I’ve been to Beyonce concert costing £70 as the average Brit would not be able to afford more. Saying that I think there are other priorities for Africa. And people particularly African Americans touring the continent in my opinion is not one

      • Kofi Levermann

        Chris Brown also got 1 million Dollar for a concert in Ghana 2013 sponsored by RLG…

        Your point is valid. There is a financial gain for artists and no excuse to not perform! I still think those artists are overpaid.

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        For starters, you’re speaking about sponsored events, NOT world tours. If a sponsor can pay the artists fees, and they are willing to come (some artists do not want to be affiliated with sponsors, and some have conflicting sponsorship deals that make them unable to participate). A World tour however is not sponsored, and Bey is averaging 5.4 million per concert right now, and many americans were unable to afford her tickets. (Also, 500 thousand US dollars is not a lot of money for artists nowadays, so if you’re hoping to pull big name artists, the price will be significantly higher to attract them). A thousand U.S. dollars for a studio apartments in Paris, NY, of LA is actually a deal. A one bedroom apartment in LA can run about 2500+, and it may not even be in a nice area (that’s where I was raised). Also, I looked up the cost of living intros locations and if you look at them in USD and compare them to living in say Calabasas, CA (where I’m from)…theres a big difference. And you’re asking Western artists to go to nonwestern locations (and note even during their world tours, they don’t typically stay in non-Western locations for long). You’re asking people with international demand (like Beyonce) to come, when she doesn’t even go to all locations (current world tour is not going to Asia either). Also consider travel restrictions (many african airlines have poor safety ratings and are not permitted to land outside of the continent, os these artists may have to arrange to fly their private jets, which is a personal cost to the artists so they’ll already need to know they make that back). And honestly it just depends on the international artist and how much they’re used to making. (Also, never heard of Stromae before this moment but did some research and he’s only performed in the US once.)

        • Marie Amon

          You have some very good points here Kitty. Just wanted to clear something up though, artists don t have to fly with african airlines because the main african cities welcome top european american and asian companies ( Abidjan welcomes Air France, and Emirate every day. Accra welcomes Air France, Delta, British Airways on regular basis too… Jo’burg, Nairobi welcome pretty much every thing from Asia, Europe or America to say the least….)
          To me, artists, the one that have a popular following accross the globe should really consider going to some African locations: 80 000 people attending a Chris Brown concert in Morroco? that should ring a bell for these artists. There’s definitely a market to be tapped into here.

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            I’m referring to travel restrictions once within the continent, not just getting there, for a team of 200+ people, with sets and costumes. And once you are within the continent and you have a much more limited choice of travel for a very large team, these limitations will start to take its toll. Not saying its impossible, but within a tour group you want things to go as smooth as possible and these are definitely roadblocks to consider. Chris Brown’s performance in morocco (2016) was for a festival and sponsored, not for a world tour. These are two different forms of revenue. (Though music festivals in Africa should attract more big Western artists, but it all depends on if they’re able to afford them, and for big artists sometimes they just don’t want to perform outside of their own schedule, or they have conflicting sponsorships that limit them.) World Tours are not sponsored, and while music festivals with multiple artists are often able to gather a huge crowd, your directors would want a guarantee they’d be able to get such a crowd. In certain locations its well known that people will travel to see the artist and the stadium will fill, but in other locations it is not. And with big artists come bigger ticket costs. CHEAP tickets for Beyonce cost $300 ($175,804 CFA), and you would be pretty far back, and for VIP tickets? $3,600 USD ($2,109,655 CFA), and honestly not everybody can afford that, both in the US and abroad. There is a market there, and we should encourage that market to grow and develop competitively.

    • Jr ushanga

      Bravo Missbeanz

    • Mka

      $300???!!! You make a fair point. I know not one Kenyan who will spend Ksh 30,000 to be stuffed in a stadium, even if its for the Queen Bey!

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Dude, $300 was not even the most expensive tickets, you wouldn’t even be close to the stage at that price. Big artists charge huge amounts, and when scouting tour locations they’d probably want to continue making that amount. Currently Bey is averaging 5.4 million USD per tour, and its expected to go up during the European part of the tour.

  • Kitty Karnivalle

    It’s an interesting position, but being unapologetically black shouldn’t require going to Africa? The African diaspora is spread across a multitude of countries, and a pilgrimage to Africa is not a requirement for being black. Black culture both within and outside of Africa borrows from each other constantly, we are united under similar experiences and bond over our difference. When Africans borrow from black-american culture a pilgrimage to the US is not a requirement. When artists are using African influences they are connecting to their own blackness and have a right to do so as black individuals. Additionally, to say Africa has heavily influenced these artist but not specify which ones/pieces is very vague, and to criticize American and European artists for mostly touring in American and European locations shows a large disregard for the influence western culture has over (shock) western artists.

    • JoelRyanB

      Hi Kitty, thanks for reading.

      Good points you raise, however I believe Africa is the start of all things when it comes to Black people. You are right, a pilgrimage to Africa is not a requirement at all, I never said it was. I myself haven’t been for over 10 years.

      I think it’s amazing when artists use african influences in their art and if I was to mention each example, this article would be a dissertation. I don’t think these artists are fake, but think thy are brave and changing the game. I used a few images to illustrate my point plus I didn’t want to target specific artists.

      I’m not criticising artists for mostly touring in western countries , but I am criticising the fact they call it a ‘World Tour’. A ‘World Tour’ which for some artists will feature music and choreography highlighting black development and justice. This development some Americans are looking for is rooted back from when we were taken from our motherland on slaveships which was in Africa. I do understand where Americans separate themselves however being from Britain where the majority of black people are second & third generation immigrants we know exactly where we came from so the connection is there.

      One of my lecturers at a very good university gets his class at the beginning of each year to draw a map of the world from memory, he recently showed us some examples. It was interesting to see how many people had completely missed out the little detail which was Africa, a whole continent.

      Really appreciate you reading and commenting, please do feel free to share your thoughts on social media also x

    • JoelRyanB

      Hi Kitty, thanks for reading.

      Good points you raise, however I believe Africa is the start of all things when it comes to Black people. You are right, a pilgrimage to Africa is not a requirement at all, I never said it was. I myself haven’t been for over 10 years.

      I think it’s amazing when artists use african influences in their art and if I was to mention each example, this article would be a dissertation. I don’t think these artists are fake, but think thy are brave and changing the game. I used a few images to illustrate my point plus I didn’t want to target specific artists.

      I’m not criticising artists for mostly touring in western countries , but I am criticising the fact they call it a ‘World Tour’. A ‘World Tour’ which for some artists will feature music and choreography highlighting black development and justice. This development some Americans are looking for is rooted back from when we were taken from our motherland on slaveships which was in Africa. I do understand where Americans separate themselves however being from Britain where the majority of black people are second & third generation immigrants we know exactly where we came from so the connection is there.

      One of my lecturers at a very good university gets his class at the beginning of each year to draw a map of the world from memory, he recently showed us some examples. It was interesting to see how many people had completely missed out the little detail which was Africa, a whole continent.

      Really appreciate you reading and commenting, please do feel free to share your thoughts on social media also x

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Let’s be realistic, If you want a BIG artist to come to African venues during their world tours (meaning performances independent of sponsorships), there needs to be a large financial demand, and availability. There is certainly the demand, and the ability in terms of large venues. Now with transportation there are some more roadblocks (ex. many african airlines have poor safety ratings so the artist wold have to fly their private jets, but they’d want to recoup that cost). I’m not saying its impossible, I just think we need to be realistic in our options. Not every artist will be willing (especially big artists used to make 3+ million per performance), but some will and they should be encouraged to. (Though of the artists pictured as performing in Africa, some have only ventured outside of South Africa once).
        African is the origin for black people, but it is NOT the start of all things for them. Many black people outside of Africa have created their own cultures independent of Africa, and that in itself needs to be respected. Black Americans have created their own culture that is copied constantly internationally, independent of African influences. Many artists call their tours World Tours and exclude various locations, Africa is not exclusive in this regard, sometimes South America is excluded, currently the Formation World Tour is excluding the Middle East and Asia). And black artists can use black influences in their work without going to Africa, because as I said, black culture exists independently of African culture (though Lemonade the film did have strong African AND African American influences, but the music itself did not). Also, saying you’re not providing more information because it’s just an article and not a dissertation is poor journalism. You don’t have to write a dissertation to cite your sources and give details. Additionally, the structuring of the photos used are misleading to the reader. Amber Rose went to Nigeria last year, and Nicki recently toured in South Africa and added another date when the demand was high. ” If you like your cornrow (Kim K Boxer-Braids)”, a hairstyle that derives from African braiding that black americans made popular and have to constantly see appropriated, and “negro nose & afros” which exist internationally and not just in Africa, such wording makes it seem as though an appreciation for these things requires visitation to Africa, (completely ignoring that black americans are the ones who made this popular.
        One could argue that African artists who wish to wear dashikis must tour to the US to do so (because while dashikis are typically made with african prints, the cut of the style itself originated in NY during the black panther movement in the 70’s, and then migrated back to Africa). The creation of the dashiki itself shows the power and influence the diaspora can have when we share mutual understand gin and respect for each other. Now, I agree wit the over al premise of this article, more artist should tour in Africa (not just South Africa). That message can be said without using misleading journalism and poor examples that degrade black american culture. This not not said to discourage your work, as an international University student I rely heavily on the media and I have a strong encouragement for good journalism, so I encourage you to continue your work but do it thoughtfully and eloquently. Be careful of how you word things, cite your sources, and do extensive research, you have an important message to the world.

        • rumagin

          Not one word about the Caribbean, just this faux ethno-nationalism for black america, that constantly erases the power of the black Caribbean in the formations of North American blackness.

          your argument would be more salient if you were aware of your own blind spots and biases.

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            I did not speak on black-caribbean’s because I operate in spaces that are void of black caribbean culture. Not that it is not present, but I cannot speak on something I don’t have much experience with. (My mother has much more experience with it than I do.) And I was specifically speaking on black culture and Africa culture. I was not speaking on Caribbean culture, not that respect for the origins of caribbean influences shouldn’t be discussed, that just wasn’t the conversation we were having. However, what black-caribbean influences do you see in the formation of north american blackness? Not that those within the diaspora don’t have a cultural exchange, but black american culture does exist independently of african and caribbean influence for the majority. And we should note that it is black american culture that is constantly copied internationally by all races, no other culture has had that global impact (besides western culture).

        • Jessi Nicky

          I’m so sorry but you are wrong on where you think Danshikis originated from. It is a Yoruba word for the top men wear with traditional trousers also used by Hausa (local people of West Africa amongst others) and was made popular in America by Walter Eugene King. The style is still worn by Yoruba at traditional ceremonies. I was agreeing with your points until you stated that untruth. Yes people should tour Africa but my view is that it shouldn’t be at the disadvantage of the local people. In terms of plane crashes I think you will find that most crashes in recent times have not been in Africa as international airlines like British Airways fly to Africa. I also feel that many of the Americans that visit do so when their careers are dwindling in the West

        • Jessi Nicky

          I’m so sorry but you are wrong on where you think Danshikis originated from. It is a Yoruba word for the top men wear with traditional trousers also used by Hausa (local people of West Africa amongst others) and was made popular in America by Walter Eugene King. The style is still worn by Yoruba at traditional ceremonies. I was agreeing with your points until you stated that untruth. Yes people should tour Africa but my view is that it shouldn’t be at the disadvantage of the local people. In terms of plane crashes I think you will find that most crashes in recent times have not been in Africa as international airlines like British Airways fly to Africa. I also feel that many of the Americans that visit do so when their careers are dwindling in the West

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Let’s be realistic, If you want a BIG artist to come to African venues during their world tours (meaning performances independent of sponsorships), there needs to be a large financial demand, and availability. There is certainly the demand, and the ability in terms of large venues. Now with transportation there are some more roadblocks (ex. many african airlines have poor safety ratings so the artist wold have to fly their private jets, but they’d want to recoup that cost). I’m not saying its impossible, I just think we need to be realistic in our options. Not every artist will be willing (especially big artists used to make 3+ million per performance), but some will and they should be encouraged to. (Though of the artists pictured as performing in Africa, some have only ventured outside of South Africa once).
        African is the origin for black people, but it is NOT the start of all things for them. Many black people outside of Africa have created their own cultures independent of Africa, and that in itself needs to be respected. Black Americans have created their own culture that is copied constantly internationally, independent of African influences. Many artists call their tours World Tours and exclude various locations, Africa is not exclusive in this regard, sometimes South America is excluded, currently the Formation World Tour is excluding the Middle East and Asia). And black artists can use black influences in their work without going to Africa, because as I said, black culture exists independently of African culture (though Lemonade the film did have strong African AND African American influences, but the music itself did not). Also, saying you’re not providing more information because it’s just an article and not a dissertation is poor journalism. You don’t have to write a dissertation to cite your sources and give details. Additionally, the structuring of the photos used are misleading to the reader. Amber Rose went to Nigeria last year, and Nicki recently toured in South Africa and added another date when the demand was high. ” If you like your cornrow (Kim K Boxer-Braids)”, a hairstyle that derives from African braiding that black americans made popular and have to constantly see appropriated, and “negro nose & afros” which exist internationally and not just in Africa, such wording makes it seem as though an appreciation for these things requires visitation to Africa, (completely ignoring that black americans are the ones who made this popular.
        One could argue that African artists who wish to wear dashikis must tour to the US to do so (because while dashikis are typically made with african prints, the cut of the style itself originated in NY during the black panther movement in the 70’s, and then migrated back to Africa). The creation of the dashiki itself shows the power and influence the diaspora can have when we share mutual understand gin and respect for each other. Now, I agree wit the over al premise of this article, more artist should tour in Africa (not just South Africa). That message can be said without using misleading journalism and poor examples that degrade black american culture. This not not said to discourage your work, as an international University student I rely heavily on the media and I have a strong encouragement for good journalism, so I encourage you to continue your work but do it thoughtfully and eloquently. Be careful of how you word things, cite your sources, and do extensive research, you have an important message to the world.

    • Jr ushanga

      Just how many african artists do tour in Africa!?! LMAO

      You need to stop this clumsy afrocentric trend ! Africans have become like little girls in the mystical “Alice in the wonderland” all waiting for the charming prince riding a white horse. Africans want people to love them, well love is something you don’t demand but command. These artists you are bashing, are not social or humanitarian associations, there are money-making industries…Now my question is “HOW MANY OF YOU ARE ABLE TO FILL A STADIUM OR A CONCERT HALL, PAYING A MINIMUM OF $100 HUN???? I can’t hear you!

      • Autodidacticbeauty

        100% agree with u

      • Marie Amon

        Let me give you a few infos Jr Ushanga. We are receiving DJ David Guetta on the 1st of June in Abidjan Cote d’Ivoire for a 30 minutes show. He will be paid $500 THOUSAND, I repeat $500 THOUSAND, for a 30 minutes show, when David Guetta is paid around $200 000 for a whole night show in Ibiza. Can you hear me now?
        CHRIS BROWN Came in Abidjan Last year and gave a 2 hour show at our main STADIUM. Tickets were running from $30 all the way to $300 if you wanted a VIP Pass. The stadium capacity? 40 000. Guess what? it was sold out! Can you hear me all right now?
        KIM K came in for 2 days in Abidjan just for a hand wave to the crowd, filling 2 main Concert halls back to back, for a Hand shake, and made around $2 millions just for showing up! can you hear me now?

        Now as far as African artists artists touring in Africa?
        DAVIDO ( Nigeria) toured in Seneagal, Cote d’Ivoire, Cameroun, Guinea, DRC, Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe…
        ARAFAT DJ ( Cote d Ivoire) toured in Cameroon, Senegal, Morocco, Benin, Togo, Burkina, Ghana…
        TOOFAN ( Togo) toured in Cote d Ivoire, Burkina, Senegal, Togo, Burkina…
        P SQUARE( Nigeria) toured pretty much in all the countries in Africa given they are biggest duos in the african music industry; Should I go on with the list????
        American artists can come over the african continent and make twice as much money and twice as fast than anywhere in the world, just by showing up.
        Now my advice to you? Please don t make a fool of yourself when you don ‘t know what you’re talking about.

      • Marie Amon

        Let me give you a few infos Jr Ushanga. We are receiving DJ David Guetta on the 1st of June in Abidjan Cote d’Ivoire for a 30 minutes show. He will be paid $500 THOUSAND, I repeat $500 THOUSAND, for a 30 minutes show, when David Guetta is paid around $200 000 for a whole night show in Ibiza. Can you hear me now?
        CHRIS BROWN Came in Abidjan Last year and gave a 2 hour show at our main STADIUM. Tickets were running from $30 all the way to $300 if you wanted a VIP Pass. The stadium capacity? 40 000. Guess what? it was sold out! Can you hear me all right now?
        KIM K came in for 2 days in Abidjan just for a hand wave to the crowd, filling 2 main Concert halls back to back, for a Hand shake, and made around $2 millions just for showing up! can you hear me now?

        Now as far as African artists artists touring in Africa?
        DAVIDO ( Nigeria) toured in Seneagal, Cote d’Ivoire, Cameroun, Guinea, DRC, Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe…
        ARAFAT DJ ( Cote d Ivoire) toured in Cameroon, Senegal, Morocco, Benin, Togo, Burkina, Ghana…
        TOOFAN ( Togo) toured in Cote d Ivoire, Burkina, Senegal, Togo, Burkina…
        P SQUARE( Nigeria) toured pretty much in all the countries in Africa given they are biggest duos in the african music industry; Should I go on with the list????
        American artists can come over the african continent and make twice as much money and twice as fast than anywhere in the world, just by showing up.
        Now my advice to you? Please don t make a fool of yourself when you don ‘t know what you’re talking about.

      • kenn

        Lol. You are so naive. The government will gladly foot the bill. Get educated

        • Jr ushanga

          Another fool. Ask the goddamn government to feed you first.GET FED

          • kenn

            Learn to civil in your response. Don’t be a base and condescending wise man.

        • Kitty Karnivalle

          Governments should not be footing the bill for expensive performers though, that in itself is a problem. If you want artists to tour in other locations, it needs to be both accessible and profitable. Bey is averaging 5.4 million per concert in the US, and many Americans couldn’t afford her expensive tickets.

    • Autodidacticbeauty

      Very true…I am so tired of this “prove your blackness” stuff….it annoys me that we can’t celebrate people for who they are and what they CAN do for our communities…why do we keep trying to shame one another on such mundane topics? Doesn’t Africa have more to worry about than Beyonce in concert?

      We need to to better.

    • Charlie Brownskin

      it’s not solely about borrowing from a culture. it’s about voluntarily connecting ourselves to the continent in word and show (fists raised), but not making the effort to know what our displays really means. africa is more than septum rings, body paint, and bold fabric patterns. i agree with the writer. IF you’re going to lay claim (my africa, my ancestors), then get educated. otherwise, are we any different than the other man that pimps us for profit?

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        I agree that one should be educated, but I’m saying this required pilgrimage is a stretch. And I’d hope those in Africa who choose to use black american culture also educate themselves on our struggle as well, don’t just use our creations (music, dance, fashion) and then disregard us.

        • shay fi

          “And I’d hope those in Africa who choose to use black american culture also educate themselves on our struggle as well, don’t just use our creations (music, dance, fashion) and then disregard us.”

          The realest thing ever said. too many of them disregard the AA experience.

          • Lucia Broeidt

            Not true

        • rumagin

          And i hope those in North America who use Caribbean culture should also educate themselves themselves on our struggle as well, don’t just use our creations (music, dance, fashion) and then disregard us. Which happens all the time!

          Intellectualism for intellectualism sake is a waste. There is truth that more artists should go to Africa, why try to argue against that truth?

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            I’m not arguing against it, I’m saying there should be a respect for the origins of African culture by american artists, but the same should be done vice versa or African artists, and caribbean artists/culture as well. For those within the diaspora to unite and connect effectively there must be mutual love and respect.

        • Lucia Broeidt

          As an African (born, bred & rooted here all my life), I can assure you that we know all about your struggle. Africans are fed American culture, history & lifestyle on a daily basis (including african american history/culture). Here in South Africa we were listening to 60% American music on our radio stations until literally a few weeks ago where it has been drastically changed to 90% SA music. It’s sad that American media portray us only as a pity, negative & dangerous story.

          I think it should be on every African American’s bucket list to visit at least one African country in their life time.

          • Refeloe

            AMEN! AMEN! AMEN!

          • Refeloe

            AMEN! AMEN! AMEN!

          • The Kid

            I agree, and as an AFRO-CUBANA i have TWO places i need to go!

    • Charlie Brownskin

      it’s not solely about borrowing from a culture. it’s about voluntarily connecting ourselves to the continent in word and show (fists raised), but not making the effort to know what our displays really means. africa is more than septum rings, body paint, and bold fabric patterns. i agree with the writer. IF you’re going to lay claim (my africa, my ancestors), then get educated. otherwise, are we any different than the other man that pimps us for profit?

    • lipz

      You can’t completely talk about Africa and it’s cultures if you’ve never been, especially as Africa and it’s cultures are not so easily seen or represented in western media. It’s easier for an african to look and have an idea of african american cultures (because being in America means your voices are heard and seen all over the world) than it is for an african american to look at and understand african cultures

      It’s not about proving blackness. It’s about showing genuine interest in seeing Africa for what it is outside of western media and outside of this heaven some afrocentrics paint it to be. It’s also the chance to reconnect, not just spiritually but economically, as humanitarians, politically, culturally and or genetically too. It’s home. It’s where the cultures of the diaspora began. It’s your roots from the music, the dances, the food we eat to the language we speak. Why wouldn’t you want to pay it homage? Americans LOVE Western Europe because that’s the Anglo-American european roots. Thats why theyve always maintained a cultural, economical and political connection. However, its not the roots of African Americans. Really we should have this same revere for africa (as well as other country’s that the diaspora inhabits eg caribbean). Going to Africa should be as important to us, just like how Anglo-American see Britain and France etc

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Difference is, these artists are not completely talking about Africa and its cultures? Some are tying specific parts that they have in their lineage. And being a black american means that black culture is regularly appropriated and misused by other cultures around the world, but the one continent we don’t mind using our culture is Africa because we recognize it as a familial nation, a place we know we originated from. And for many african americans its actually painful not to be able to have a closer connection to african cultures because its a reminder of the NATURE of how we came to be in the U.S. Because slaves were documented as property, it costs a lot of money to find out where exactly ones family originated from, and even then theres no guarantee. I recently told a Nigerin friend of mine how hard it was for black americans to trace our lineage and she was surprised to hear how difficult it was. Most black americans can only trace 3-6 generations back, nowhere near far enough to find out roots in Africa, so instead we connect to the African diaspora as a whole, and many black people in various regions do that as well. Also, economically traveling to Africa is significantly more costly than traveling to Europe. (I had the option of traveling to Lagos or Tokyo this summer and I was surprised to find that Tokyo was cheaper). Also you should know Americans do not travel to Europe to connect to any sort of heritage, usually its just a vacation location thats is preferable cause its still Western. And you seem to have a misconstructed idea of what it means to be a black american, it does not mean our voices are heard around the world, our culture is seen but we are not heard. Just look at how America treats its own black citizens (hate crimes, police brutality), and how anti-black racism permeates other nations around the world.

        • lipz

          Most of what you said, doesn’t seem to have anything to do with what I wrote.

          What do you mean Americans do not travel to Europe to “connect to any sort of heritage”? There’s a reason most travel to Europe. America IS hegemonically Western European. The media, literature, fashion, education, politics etc all are fundamentally western european culturally. There’s a reason why European cars, designers, cities and languages are romanticised and desired in media and literatures so much in America from Gucci, to Prada, British Royalty, to Lamborghini to Paris. It’s about economics and America is a child of Britain in particular, which is part of Europe so theres a connection there. This connection, should be felt by Africa Americans towards Africa, instead of African Americans also having this false sense of connection to European countries too eg “Nxxx in Paris” or “I woke up in a new bugatti”.

          And trust me, your voices are heard, especially compared to other black voices (and other non-white ethnic groups) around the world. People around the world are much more likely to know about Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Gil Scott, Mary Angelou, black lives matter, rather than movements, heroes and authors in the Caribbean, south america, black britian and parts of Africa etc. Not to mention you do have some use of institutions like Hollywood, and TV broadcasting companies which release films and TV all over the world.

          Just because people within your country do not ACT on what is said, it doesn’t mean your voices are not heard. Some black americans don’t even know black people in Europe even exist and black europeans have existed in Europe long before America was even a thought.

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            You misunderstood whats I said so I’m going to try and make it clearer. Americans travel to Europe because they are tied as WESTERN countries. But NOT out of some “lets get back to our European roots” venture. They travel there because of its similarities in culture to the U.S. Now, foreign cars and fashion are valued for their quality and as a means of displaying ones buying power, NOT romanticized because of a “lets get back to my European roots” type thing. I specify this because you gave the impression that black americans who use african cultures should have the same “revere” for Africa as white americans do for Europe, and its should be a “get back to our roots” type venture, and I’m letting you know that that’s not the mindset of white Americans who travel to Europe. (Also you should know Americans don’t care about British royalty at all, our media was actually quite disrespectful to them because we couldn’t care less). This “false connection” to Europe in black americans has nothing to do with wanting to be European in any way, its about saying here I am as a black american who is often discriminated against and I have overcome the odds and succeeded enough tho afford a foreign car and go to foreign places that are expensive. It’s to brag about financial means, not to tie themselves genetically to European nations. “I woke up in a new bugatti” is emphasizing the ability to wake up in a 2.7 million dollar car. N*ggas in Paris is emphasizing the ability to afford traveling to an expensive location and invade spaces that were previously coded as white/European. (Owning an African made car or traveling there will not be as well known as a financial difficulty, and thus the artists want to use more well known locations and cars.) The subtexts of these songs have nothing to do with wanted to be tied to Europe, and have more to do with the artists bragging about their financial abilities. Now, famous black individuals (Malcom X, Beyonce, Gil Scott) are of course heard internationally because THEY ARE FAMOUS. I’m talking about the average black american voice being heard internationally, and its not heard unless its in the form of our culture (music, dances, fashion, ect.) being copied for other peoples enjoyment without regarding our own lives at all. Now, BLM is more likely to be known as an international movement because it have INTERNATIONAL chapters that focus on the advancement of black lives internationally, not just in America. There are BLM movements all over the world, so while it started in America, its advancing because others in the Africna diaspora have created chapters of their own that reflect their own local issues and work independently (but in support) of other chapters. You seem to know a lot about my country when you…don’t seem to be from my country at all, and don’t seem to understand how things operate within my country. Black americans do know there are black europeans, but we do not relate to them because our cultures (shock) are different. Same way black americans can sometimes have difficulty relating to black people in Germany, Tokyo, Italy, ect. because our cultures are not the same.

          • The Kid

            YES!!! Dropping KNOWLEDGE!!!

        • lipz

          Most of what you said, doesn’t seem to have anything to do with what I wrote.

          What do you mean Americans do not travel to Europe to “connect to any sort of heritage”? There’s a reason most travel to Europe. America IS hegemonically Western European. The media, literature, fashion, education, politics etc all are fundamentally western european culturally. There’s a reason why European cars, designers, cities and languages are romanticised and desired in media and literatures so much in America from Gucci, to Prada, British Royalty, to Lamborghini to Paris. It’s about economics and America is a child of Britain in particular, which is part of Europe so theres a connection there. This connection, should be felt by Africa Americans towards Africa, instead of African Americans also having this false sense of connection to European countries too eg “Nxxx in Paris” or “I woke up in a new bugatti”.

          And trust me, your voices are heard, especially compared to other black voices (and other non-white ethnic groups) around the world. People around the world are much more likely to know about Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Gil Scott, Mary Angelou, black lives matter, rather than movements, heroes and authors in the Caribbean, south america, black britian and parts of Africa etc. Not to mention you do have some use of institutions like Hollywood, and TV broadcasting companies which release films and TV all over the world.

          Just because people within your country do not ACT on what is said, it doesn’t mean your voices are not heard. Some black americans don’t even know black people in Europe even exist and black europeans have existed in Europe long before America was even a thought.

        • lipz

          …And also, I am very much aware of tracing heritages. It’s not just an issue faced by black americans. My parents are Jamaican and Bajan. But you can do that with DNA testing to give you some idea of your genetic make-up.

          Also if there were more demand for travel to Africa, then there will be more competitive prices to travel to Africa. It’s about supply and demand.

          • Kitty Karnivalle

            DNA testing gives you a very broad scope, but it cannot give you exact tribes/locations often, just match you to certain continents and races. And with the many mixing of DNA since the beginnings of slavery, its not exact enough to trace ones origins. I never said it was specifically a black american problem, I just said that it is a problem for black americans. And IF there was a demand sure it would be easier to travel to Africa…but there isn’t. Sow e can’t have a conversation about possibilities when its not whats happening in reality. (And even with more competitive air fare there would still be an economic disadvantage for many black americans.)

        • lipz

          …And also, I am very much aware of tracing heritages. It’s not just an issue faced by black americans. My parents are Jamaican and Bajan. But you can do that with DNA testing to give you some idea of your genetic make-up.

          Also if there were more demand for travel to Africa, then there will be more competitive prices to travel to Africa. It’s about supply and demand.

    • Saworieza

      I will have to disagree with you .. while we don’t exactly mind whether they tour or not … it is a serious argument that they would incorporate the African element in their albums, consult with people from Africa an also incorporate African content (Bee for instance as with Warsan Shire) .. personally I am Kenyan and it made national news that Warsan’s work was featured … but just wehn was queen bee in Kenya (for example) if not to entertain her huge following then to have an African safari? And about visiting the states … lemme lift a friend of mine’s post on the process “So today, going to the US compulsorily require a signed passport (valid
      for 6 months), completed DS-160 form, passport-sized photo(strictly 2” x
      2”), non-refundable visa application fee, proof of citizenship in
      current country, Bank Statement plus that essentiality-assessment
      interview at the embassy….WTF!!!”

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Ummm…you know all those requirements for visiting the states are also required for US citizens who want to travel outside of the country too right? That’s just the normal international travel requirements. There are some exceptions for countries that border each other (ex. U.S. and Canada), but when I traveled to Europe and when my friend traveled to Nigeria, we had to get the same things, these requirements are not abnormal or outrageous for international travel. And you have to note that black artist who incorporate African elements into their pieces have african lineage. Black people are connected via the african diaspora, but when we start to nitpick on travel requirements to share black/African culture, both sides will lose enriching elements of culture and connection.

      • Kitty Karnivalle

        Ummm…you know all those requirements for visiting the states are also required for US citizens who want to travel outside of the country too right? That’s just the normal international travel requirements. There are some exceptions for countries that border each other (ex. U.S. and Canada), but when I traveled to Europe and when my friend traveled to Nigeria, we had to get the same things, these requirements are not abnormal or outrageous for international travel. And you have to note that black artist who incorporate African elements into their pieces have african lineage. Black people are connected via the african diaspora, but when we start to nitpick on travel requirements to share black/African culture, both sides will lose enriching elements of culture and connection.

    • Saworieza

      I will have to disagree with you .. while we don’t exactly mind whether they tour or not … it is a serious argument that they would incorporate the African element in their albums, consult with people from Africa an also incorporate African content (Bee for instance as with Warsan Shire) .. personally I am Kenyan and it made national news that Warsan’s work was featured … but just wehn was queen bee in Kenya (for example) if not to entertain her huge following then to have an African safari? And about visiting the states … lemme lift a friend of mine’s post on the process “So today, going to the US compulsorily require a signed passport (valid
      for 6 months), completed DS-160 form, passport-sized photo(strictly 2” x
      2”), non-refundable visa application fee, proof of citizenship in
      current country, Bank Statement plus that essentiality-assessment
      interview at the embassy….WTF!!!”

  • Arthur Ebun Davies

    Don’t worry they’ll come. It only takes one artist to start and the rest will follow the dollar sign.

  • Kali Madden

    Thanks for sharing Joel! Very well said.

  • Loré Adenegan

    Loved reading this! Totally agree with everything said